The Well Community Church

Generations Feed Series

Philippians / Philemon

November 10, 2013

Oh to have "joy in all things." For many of us, our joy is dependent upon circumstances. When life is good, we have joy, but when life goes south, our countenance changes. Written from house arrest in Rome, the Apostle Paul pens a letter to the church in Philippi encouraging them to have "joy in all things." Through difficult circumstances and inevitable difficulties, Paul points to a profound opportunity that we have to show Christ to people through our adversity. Though happiness may vary depending upon our circumstances, our joy can thrive regardless. In just four short chapters Paul admonishes his readers to see these opportunities to shine brightest when life seems darkest.

PHILIPPIANS

AUTHOR

Paul, originally named Saul, a Pharisee until confronted by Jesus Christ.

DATE

Likely in A.D. 61-62, at or near the end of Paul’s first imprisonment in Rome, from which he also wrote Ephesians, Colossians and Philemon.

THEME

The Church’s Joy

Joy should extend to all believers and into every situation and circumstance of life, because He gives us life.

ADDITIONAL INFO

Philippi, named after the father of Alexander the Great, Philip, was a military community, favored with Roman citizenship, and the location of one of the largest universities in the world at that time. Paul sent this letter by the hand of Epaphroditus and thanked the Philippians for their generous gifts and participation with him in the gospel. He let them know he was experiencing joy in the midst of difficulty and so could they. He knew that the letter as well as seeing and hearing from Epaphroditus would be an encouragement for them.

© Dr. Rick Taylor

PHILEMON

AUTHOR

Paul, originally named Saul, a Pharisee until confronted by Jesus Christ.

DATE

Likely around A.D. 60-61 when Paul was under house arrest in Rome awaiting trial.

THEME

The Church’s Society

The society of the church includes all people, no matter their color or station in life, and speaks to how they ought to live with one another.

ADDITIONAL INFO

While Paul was under house arrest in Rome, his first Roman imprisonment, he had the chance to meet and lead a runaway slave named Onesimus to the Lord. He wrote this letter to Onesimus’ master, Philemon, a slave owner and member of the church at Colossae, appealing to him to treat Onesimus as he would treat Paul himself. The letter does not address the rightness or wrongness of slavery, but does paint a picture that in a world of slavery a Christian master should treat his Christian slave as a brother, with honor and respect.

© Dr. Rick Taylor


Resources for Philippians and Philemon

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